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Faculty

Faculty Profiles by Areas of Specialization

BRAIN, BEHAVIOR AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE FACULTY
FACULTY MEMBER RESEARCH INTEREST OTHER AREA AFFILIATIONS
ROBERT ALLISON
(PhD York)
Human perception of motion and depth. Psychophysical and computational methods to study depth perception in natural and virtual environments. Applications to the design of the human-computer interface for virtual reality and simulator systems. Other interests include computer vision; the measurement and analysis of eye movements and related applications; and the measurement and perception of human motion.
CHRISTOPER BERGEVIN                         (PhD Massachusetts Institute of Technology)                   e-mail                             website
My primary research interests deals with the auditory system, chiefly in the context of how sound is transduced by the ear into neural impulses going to the brain. Remarkably, somehow in the process of being a very sensitive detector, the (healthy) ear generates and subsequently emits sounds that can be detected non-invasively using a sensitive microphone. These sounds, known as otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), reveal many aspects of the inner workings of the ear and also have many translational applications (e.g., clinical audiology). Our lab combines both experimental (acoustic and neurophysiological) and theoretical/modeling approaches across a broad comparative framework (humans, birds, lizards) so to help us better understand OAEs and thereby the key biophysical processes at work that allow us to hear the world around us. Centre for Vision Research

Also appointed to the Graduate Program in Biology

Graduate Program in Physics & Astronomy

J. DOUGLAS CRAWFORD
(PhD Western Ontario)                  
e-mail
Systems, cognitive, and computational neuroscience; visual-motor transformations. Neural mechanisms and computational principles used by the brain to perceive 3-D space and generate accurate 3-D orienting movements. Visual consequences and control of eye movements, eye and head gaze shifts, and visually guided arm movements.
JOSEPH DeSOUZA
(PhD Western Ontario)                             
e-mail
Web site
Eye movements, hand and pointing movements, motion processing pathways and how these mechanisms are modulated by attentional mechanisms and how the brain processes sensory information until the final motor movement (coordinate transformations); employs a systems neuroscience approach using the technologies of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and electrophysiology. Web site: www.braindetective.com Centre for Vision Research

Also appointed to the Graduate Program in Biology

JAMES H. ELDER
(PhD McGill)            
e-mail
Web site
Psychophysics and computational modelling of visual perception. Computer vision. Perceptual organization, visual detection, natural scene statistics, visual attention, shape perception, neural modeling. Applications in visual surveillance, remote learning and geomatics. www.elderlab.yorku.ca
MAZYAR FALLAH
(PhD Princeton University)    
 e-mail
Web site
Visual perception and attention laboratory. Systems and cognitive neuroscience approaches to understanding attentional mechanisms, feature binding, and object processing.
LAURENCE R. HARRIS
(PhD Cambridge)
The Harrislab multisensory integration laboratory explores the ways in which we combine information from different senses. How do hearing, vision, touch, and sensory information about body movement and position combine to tell us where and when events happen and what the body’s current position and orientation is? Techniques include eye and head tracking, psychophysics and virtual reality. Developmental Science
DENISE Y. HENRIQUES
(PhD York)      Web site
Sensorimotor control and learning; eye, head, limb movements and coordination; vision, haptics, kinesthesia; sensorimotor integration.
KARI L. HOFFMAN
(PhD Univeristy of Arizona)              e-mail
Web site
Face and object perception, learning and memory. Use of large-scale electrophysiological recordings to track cell assembly formation during behavioral and sleep epochs. Emphasis on the use of behaviorally-relevant, social stimuli and untrained behavioral responses.
SUZANNE E. MacDONALD
(PhD Alberta)
Comparative cognition, including learning and memory processes in primate species.
RICHARD F. MURRAY
(PhD Toronto)            e-mail
Web site
 Visual perception. Psychophysics. Computational and mathematical modelling. 2D and 3D shape. Perceptual organization. Visual attention. Natural scene statistics. Signal detection theory. See www.yorku.ca/rfm
SUSAN MURTHA
(PhD Carleton)
Cognitive neuroscience. Investigating attention and memory (facilitation and/or attenuation) by exploring the neural underpinnings of function through computerized testing procedures or brain imaging in the young, healthy aging population or in those patients at the very early stages of dementia. Developmental Science
HIROSHI ONO
(PhD Stanford)
(Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus)                 
e-mail
Web site
Space perception, binocular vision, eye movement. History and Theory of Psychology
DAVID M. REGAN
(PhD DSc London)
(Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus)
 FRSC  e-mail
Web site
Human brain research. Visual psychophysics: spatial form vision, figure-ground, depth vision, motion, colour, spatial discriminations. Auditory psychophysics: AM and FM channels, auditory localization, speech perception. Human evoked potentials and magnetic brain responses (sensory), visual and auditory. Somatosensation. Application of visual and auditory psychophysics and brain recording to medicine (multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, glaucoma, amblyopia). Vision in aviation and driving. Eye movements. Clinical, Clinical Developmental, Developmental Science
JOSÉE RIVEST
(PhD Harvard)
Visual perception; shape perception in brain damaged individuals and normals. How different visual attributes such as colour, luminance, texture and motion are integrated together to provide visual analyses.
LAUREN SERGIO
(PhD McGill)
Behavioural and fMRI studies of eye-hand coordination; neural mechanisms underlying visually guided reaching in parietal and premotor cortex; control of voluntary movement in neurological patient populations. Web page: www.yorku.ca/lsergio
IRWIN SILVERMAN
(PhD Rochester)
(Professor Emeritus)     
e-mail
Web site
Human ethology and evolutionary psychology. Clinical, Clinical Developmental, Developmental Science, History and Theory of Psychology, Social and Personality
JENNIFER STEEVES
(PhD York University)              
e-mail
Web site
Scene and face processing, psychophysics and neuroimaging in neurological patients and healthy controls.
MARTIN J. STEINBACH
(PhD M.I.T.)
(Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus)                 
e-mail
Abnormal visual perception and eye movements. Studying the oculomotor control mechanisms of people who have had misaligned eyes (strabismus, or squint) surgically or pharmacologically treated has led to insights about the anatomy of sensory structures in eye muscles and the role they play in telling the brain which way the eyes are pointing. The visual adaptations children make after losing one eye at an early age are also providing insights about the consequences of visual deprivation during critical periods in development. We are also studying changes to visual functioning produced by macular degeneration in aging people.
W. DALE STEVENS    (Ph.D. University of Toronto)                      e-mail My primary research interests are in the areas of cognitive neuroscience, functional neuroimaging (MRI), and neurocognitive development and aging. My program of research broadly investigates the neurocognitive specialization, organization, and interaction of brain systems that underlie human conceptual processing, and the related processes of memory and perceptual abstraction. I use a combination of behavioral, neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and neurostimulation methodologies (e.g., MRI, TMS) to elucidate how cognitive abstraction underlies our ability to grasp, retain, and retrieve information in the form of conceptual knowledge. I also investigate how these processes are affected by healthy aging, and by developmental and neurological disorders. Developmental Science
NEIL WIENER
(PhD New York)
(Professor Emeritus)
          Web site
The analyses of sociobiological theories as applied to within and between human group differences.
LAURIE M. WILCOX
(PhD Western Ontario)                     Web site
Fundamental and applied aspects of stereoscopic (3D) depth perception with a focus on how stereopsis is used in the ‘real world’; understanding how the brain achieves such an exquisite depth percept from such complex information; modelling how it is then capable of reconstructing depth in impoverished stimuli. Also appointed to the Graduate Program in Biology
FRANCES WILKINSON
(PhD Dalhousie Emeritus) (Professor Emeritus)                    e-mail
Web site
Visual perception with particular emphasis on face and shape recognition. Involvement of the visual system in migraine. Developmental Science
HUGH WILSON
(PhD Chicago) (Professor Emeritus)
Psychophysics of form vision and motion perception, face perception, neural modeling of cortical visual function, FMRI brain imaging of human visual cortical areas, nonlinear dynamics. Also appointed to the Graduate Program in Biology
THILO WOMELSDORF (PhD Georg August University)

e-mail
Web site

Attentional control, Decision making, Reinforcement learning: The lab's work focuses on the neuronal computations and network mechanisms underlying attentional control and value based decision making. The major approach is the physiological characterization of neuronal activity in large scale networks and microcircuits and its link to higher cognitive (attentional) processes. Also appointed to the Graduate Program in Biology
FACULTY FROM OTHER AREAS AFFILIATED WITH THE BRAIN, BEHAVIOR AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE AREA
FACULTY MEMBER PRIMARY AREA AFFILIATION RESEARCH INTEREST
SCOTT A. ADLER
(PhD Rutgers) e-mail
Web site
Developmental Science Infants’ visual, attentional and memory development from a neuroscience perspective. Specific topics include the relation between cognitive processes and young infants’ formation of future-oriented expectations for the spatial, temporal, and content information of visual events; the interface between visual expectations and memory processes; development of mechanisms for selective attention and visual search; development of object recognition; and the processes involved in infants’ control and execution of eye movements.
JAMES M. BEBKO
(PhD York)e-mail
Clinical, Developmental Science Cognitive and attention skills in children with autism, developmental disabilities and children who are deaf. Roles of metacognition (awareness of self) and language proficiency (e.g., English or signed systems) in the cognitive development of these groups. Early identification; assessment methods; intervention effectiveness.
ELLEN BIALYSTOK
(PhD Toronto) e-mail
Web site
Developmental Science Cognitive development and literacy acquisition in monolingual and bilingual children, development of executive processes across the lifespan, and effect of bilingualism on cognitive aging. Methods include studying participants of all ages (4-80 years) using behavioural and imaging techniques.
JOANNA BLAKE
(PhD City University of New York)
(Professor Emeritus)
e-mail
Developmental Science Prelinguistic development and the relation of babbling, gestures and sensorimotor abilities during infancy to the acquisition of language. Phylogenetic continuity in precursors to language. Cognitive correlates of language impairment. Book reading styles to young children and their relation to language measures.
CAROLINE DAVIS
(PhD York
)
Social and Personality Aetiological factors in the development of eating disorders, compulsive overeating, and obesity. Issues related to the biological basis of personality and how this relates to disordered eating, and other addictive behaviours, are also considered.
JOHN EASTWOOD
(PhD Waterloo)e-mail
Web site
Clinical Explores how the emotional state of an observer, and also the emotional significance of environmental information, influences the deployment of attention. Exploring the experience of boredom, and individual differences that impact on susceptibility to boredom. Focused on gaining a better understanding of basic psychological processes, as well as examining issues that relate more specifically to clinical psychology.
VINOD GOEL
(PhD U of California at Berkeley) e-mail
Web site
Developmental Science Cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience. Understanding the cognitive and neurophysiological structures and processes underlying human reasoning and problem solving abilities. Verbal protocol analysis studies of normal and patient populations, computational modelling, and neuroimaging techniques involving Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (FMRI). Bridging the “gap” between cognitive and neurophysiological vocabularies.
CHRISTOPHER D. GREEN
(PhD Toronto
)e-mail
Web site
History and Theory of Psychology History of American experimental psychology (ca. 1880-1930). Ada Lovelace, Charles Babbage, and his Analytical Engine. Research methods and statistics. Development and delivery of electronic research and educational materials (websites, digital video, podcasts, etc.)
JANICE JOHNSON
(PhD York)e-mail
Web site
Developmental Science Cognitive development, individual differences, and cognitive process analysis. Culture-fair assessment of cognitive capacity in mainstream and special developmental samples (e.g., deaf, gifted, ESL, language delayed); children’s intuitive reasoning in mathematics; measurement of executive functions in children and adults; cognitive style and language processing; cognitivedevelopmental factors in metaphor comprehension; mental arousal/motivation as factors in cognitive performance.
RAYMOND A. MAR
(PhD University of Toronto)e-mail
Web site
Social and Personality Projection of the self into fictional narratives. Ascription of intentionality to abstract social agents. Individual differences in, and the core processes of, empathy and social understanding. Imagination. Stimulation based theories of language comprehension. And the neural underpinnings of these processes.
TIMOTHY MOORE
(Chair / Professor Department of Psychology,Glendon College)e-mail 
Clinical, Developmental Psychology FASD and the criminal justice system; forensic psychology.
NORMAN PARK
(PhD Toronto) e-mail
Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences Investigates the cognitive and neuropsychological processes associated with perceiving, remembering, and performing goal-directed naturalistic actions. Has a particular interest in the roles of attention and memory. Based on this understanding develops and evaluates methods of neuropsychological rehabilitation of brain-injured individuals.
JUAN PASCUAL-LEONE
(MD Valencia, PhD Geneva)
(Professor Emeritus)
e-mail
Developmental Science Cognitive development and neuropsychology. Mental attention, working memory, executive functions, intelligence, representation, problem-solving, learning, and their organismic processes. Methods of task analysis. Epistemology/metatheories of human science. NeoPiagetian research on childhood, infancy, adulthood and aging.
JILL B. RICH
(PhD Victoria) e-mail
Web site
Clinical Primary research focus is on different aspects of memory processing (e.g., semantic memory, implicit memory, source memory, prospective memory) and cognition in healthy young individuals, normal aging, and mild cognitive impairment (a transitional stage between healthy aging and dementia) . Her clinical work involves neuropsychological assessment, particularly for differential diagnosis of dementia in geriatric populations.
R. SHAYNA ROSENBAUM
(PhD Toronto) e-mail
Web site
Clinical Studies the organization of different types of memory in the brain using cognitive, neuropsychological, and functional neuroimaging methods. Patient and fMRI studies of recent and remote memory; hippocampal and cortical contributions to episodic, semantic, and spatial memory; representation of theory of mind and the self in prefrontal and temporoparietal cortex.
ERIN C. ROSS
(PhD Western Ontario)
e-mail
Social and Personality How psychologists conceptualize and research lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender experience. Stereotypes of sexual assault and childhood sexual abuse survivors.
ANNE E. RUSSON
(PhD Montreal)e-mail
Developmental Science Comparative/evolutionary studies of nonhuman primates, especially the great apes (orangutans, chimpanzees) and especially cognitive development. Imitation and other forms of social learning, tool use, ecological problem solving (arboreal and foraging problems), and the evolution of primate and great ape intelligence. Study of various facets of orangutan intelligence and cognitive ecology in free-ranging ex-captive orangutans in Indonesian Borneo.

Updated on January 29th, 2016.