Developmental Science

Faculty Profiles by Areas of Specialization

DEVELOPMENTAL SCIENCE
FACULTY MEMBER RESEARCH INTEREST OTHER AREA AFFILIATIONS
SCOTT A. ADLER
(PhD Rutgers University)
e-mail
website
Infants' visual, attentional and memory development from a neuroscience perspective. Specific topics include the relation between cognitive processes and young infants' formation of future-oriented expectations for the spatial, temporal, and content information of visual events; the interface between visual expectations and memory processes; development of mechanisms for selective attention and visual search; development of object recognition; and the processes involved in infants' control and execution of eye movements.

TAKING GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS?: YES

Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences
ELLEN BIALYSTOK
(PhD University of Toronto) 
e-mail
website
Cognitive development and literacy acquisition in monolingual and bilingual children, development of executive processes across the lifespan, and effect of bilingualism on cognitive aging. Methods include studying participants of all ages (4-80 years) using behavioural and imaging techniques.

TAKING GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS?: YES

Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences
VINOD GOEL
(PhD University of California at Berkeley)
e-mail
website
Cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience. Understanding the cognitive and neurophysiological structures and processes underlying human reasoning and problem solving abilities. Verbal protocol analysis studies of normal and patient populations, computational modelling, and neuroimaging techniques involving Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (FMRI). Bridging the "gap" between cognitive and neurophysiological vocabularies.

TAKING GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS?: YES

Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences
JANICE JOHNSON
(PhD York University)
e-mail
website
Cognitive development, individual differences, and cognitive process analysis. Culture-fair assessment of cognitive capacity in mainstream and special developmental samples (e.g., deaf, gifted, ESL, language delayed); children's intuitive reasoning in mathematics; measurement of executive functions in children and adults; cognitive style and language processing; cognitive developmental factors in metaphor comprehension; mental arousal/motivation as factors in cognitive performance.

TAKING GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS?: NO

Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences
JUAN PASCUAL-LEONE
(MD Valencia, PhD University of Geneva)
(Professor Emeritus)
e-mail
 Cognitive development and neuropsychology. Mental attention, working memory, executive functions, intelligence, representation, problem-solving, learning, and their organismic processes. Methods of task analysis. Epistemology/metatheories of human science. Neo-Piagetian research on childhood, infancy, adulthood and aging.

TAKING GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS?: NO

Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences Historical, Theoretical and Critical Studies of Psychology
THANUJENI PATHMAN
(PhD Emory University)
e-mail
website
Cognitive development; Developmental cognitive neuroscience; Learning and memory development; Memory for time and space; Episodic memory, autobiographical memory, and semantic memory; Brain development; Learning in naturalistic settings including science centres and museums. Methods: Behavioural assessments, eye tracking, ERP and neuroimaging

TAKING GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS?: YES

ANNE E. RUSSON              (PhD University of Montreal) Comparative/evolutionary studies of nonhuman primates, especially the great apes (orangutans, chimpanzees) and especially cognitive development. Imitation and other forms of social learning, tool use, ecological problem solving (arboreal and foraging problems), and the evolution of primate and great ape intelligence. Study of various facets of orangutan intelligence and cognitive ecology in free-ranging ex-captive orangutans in Indonesian Borneo.

TAKING GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS?: 

Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences
 W. DALE STEVENS
(PhD University of Toronto)
e-mail
 My primary research interests are in the areas of cognitive neuroscience, functional neuroimaging (MRI), and neurocognitive development and aging. My program of research broadly investigates the neurocognitive specialization, organization, and interaction of brain systems that underlie human conceptual processing, and the related processes of memory and perceptual abstraction. I use a combination of behavioral, neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and neurostimulation methodologies (e.g., MRI, TMS) to elucidate how cognitive abstraction underlies our ability to grasp, retain, and retrieve information in the form of conceptual knowledge. I also investigate how these processes are affected by healthy aging, and by developmental and neurological disorders.

TAKING GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS?: 

 Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences
MELODY WISEHEART
(PhD University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
e-mail
website
Life-span developmental changes in factors that underlie cognitive flexibility. Working memory, inhibition, and processing speed. Neural and behavioural measures of executive control and error processing. Using cognitive psychology to optimize learning and retention of educational materials. Distributed practice, testing and feedback effects

TAKING GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS?: 

Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences
GERALD YOUNG
(PhD University of Montreal)
Lifespan developmental theory, including cognitive-affective stages. Pain, posttraumatic stress disorder, and traumatic brain injury - causality considerations. The development of manual lateralization/hemispheric specialization.

TAKING GRADUATE PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS?: 

Clinical Developmental
FACULTY FROM OTHER AREAS AFFILIATED WITH THE DEVELOPMENTAL SCIENCE AREA
FACULTY MEMBER PRIMARY AREA AFFILIATION RESEARCH INTEREST
JAMES M. BEBKO
(PhD York University)
e-mail
Clinical, Developmental Science Cognitive and attention skills in children with autism, developmental disabilities, and children who are deaf. Roles of metacognition (awareness of self) and language proficiency (e.g., English or signed systems) in the cognitive development of these groups. Early identification; assessment methods; intervention effectiveness.
MARY DESROCHER
(PhD University of Toronto)
e-mail
Clinical, Developmental Science Neuropsychology. Cognitive, behavioural, and emotional functioning of children with diabetes and epilepsy. Spatial and working memory. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and congenital hypothyroidism.
GORDON L. FLETT
(PhD University of Toronto
)
e-mail
Social and Personality The roles of trait perfectionism and perfectionistic self-presentation in personal adjustment, psychosocial functioning, and health problems. The associations among personality, coping, stress, and distress in adolescents, middle-aged individuals, and the elderly.
MICHAEL FRIENDLY
(PhD Princeton University)
e-mail
website
Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences The development of methods for statistical graphics and data analysis, with particular emphasis on graphical methods for categorical data. History of data visualization. Exploratory data analysis, interactive computing, and psychological scaling.
CHRISTOPHER D. GREEN
(PhD University of Toronto
)
e-mail
website
Historical, Theoretical and Critical Studies of Psychology History of American experimental psychology (ca. 1880-1930). Ada Lovelace, Charles Babbage, and his Analytical Engine. Research methods and statistics. Development and delivery of electronic research and educational materials (websites, digital video, podcasts, etc.)
LAURENCE R. HARRIS
(PhD University of Cambridge)
Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences The Harrislab multisensory integration laboratory explores the ways in which we combine information from different senses. How do hearing, vision, touch, and sensory information about body movement and position combine to tell us where and when events happen and what the body's current position and orientation is? Techniques include eye and head tracking, psychophysics and virtual reality.
DOUG McCANN
(PhD University of Western Ontario
)
e-mail
website
Social and Personality Social information processing and socialcognitive models. Aspects of the self, depression, and interpersonal communication.
TIMOTHY MOORE
(Chair/Professor, Department of Psychology, Glendon College)
e-mail
Clinical, Developmental Psychology FASD and the criminal justice system; forensic psychology.
SUSAN MURTHA
(PhD Carleton University)
Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences Cognitive neuroscience. Investigating attention and memory (facilitation and/or attenuation) by exploring the neural underpinnings of function through computerized testing procedures or brain imaging in the young, healthy aging population or in those patients at the very early stages of dementia.
DEBRA PEPLER
(PhD University of Waterloo)
e-mail
Clinical, Developmental Science Children in families at risk; peer relations of aggressive children; bullying and victimization in childhood and adolescence; girls' aggression; prevention and intervention.
REBECCA PILLAI RIDDELL
(PhD University of British Columbia)
e-mail
website
Clinical, Developmental Science Exploring the conceptualization of chronic pain in hospitalized infants; understanding how parenting of infants impact health outcomes such as acute pain response; Pediatric psychology.
DAVID M. REGAN
(PhD DSc London University)
(Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus)
FRSC
e-mail
website
Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences Human brain research. Visual psychophysics: spatial form vision, figure-ground, depth vision, motion, colour, spatial discriminations. Auditory psychophysics: AM and FM channels, auditory localization, speech perception. Human evoked potentials and magnetic brain responses (sensory), visual and auditory. Somatosensation. Application of visual and auditory psychophysics and brain recording to medicine (multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, glaucoma, amblyopia). Vision in aviation and driving. Eye movements.
JILL B. RICH
(PhD University of Victoria)
e-mail
website
Clinical Primary research focus is on different aspects of memory processing (e.g., semantic memory, implicit memory, source memory, prospective memory) and cognition in healthy young individuals, normal aging, and mild cognitive impairment (a transitional stage between healthy aging and dementia) . Her clinical work involves neuropsychological assessment, particularly for differential diagnosis of dementia in geriatric populations.
IRWIN SILVERMAN
(PhD University of Rochester)
(Professor Emeritus)

e-mail
website
Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences Human ethology and evolutionary psychology.
JENNIFER STEELE
(PhD Harvard University)
e-mail
Social and Personality Stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination from the target’s perspective. How people combat the effects of negative self-relevant stereotypes in academic settings. How stereotypes are activated and inhibited in impression formation. The development of gender/ racial stereotypes and beliefs in children, examined from a social cognitive perspective.
THOMAS TEO
(PhD University of Vienna)
e-mail
website
Historical, Theoretical and Critical Studies of Psychology Critical reflection on the ontology, epistemology, and ethics of psychology from a historical and theoretical point of view. Studies on the history and theory of 19th century German philosophical psychology, the concept of race and racism, critical and postcolonial psychology. Interested in the history of developmental and social theory.
MAGGIE TOPLAK
(PhD OISE/University of Toronto)
e-mail
website
Clinical, Developmental Science Assessment, diagnosis and treatment of attention and learning disorders in children and adolescents; understanding how cognitive and affective processes develo in clinical and healthy populations; dual process models of human reasoning in clinical and healthy populations.
FRANCES WILKINSON
(PhD Dalhousie University)
(Professor Emeritus)

e-mail
website
Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Sciences Visual perception with particular emphasis on face and shape recognition. Involvement of the visual system in migraine.
MAXINE GALLANDER WINTRE
(PhD York University)

e-mail
website
Clinical, Developmental Science Social and emotional development in ages ranging from preschoolers to adults. Social development in the areas of advice-seeking and consultant preferences, social support provision, and social relations with parents and peers. New scales tapping perceptions of reciprocity in relations with parents, spouses and coworkers are being examined for their clinical relevance. Emotional development in the relationship between emotion, cognition and emotion regulation.